Surroundings


Tribunj is located in central Dalmatia and in its vicinity there are numerous localities worth visiting. Excursions to the National Parks of Kornati and Krka and to the towns of Sibenik and Zadar, which abound in the historical and cultural heritage of this region, are definitely the activities that you need to consider during your holiday period.

N.P. KORNATI


The Kornati archipelago – a labyrinth of stone, with eighty nine islands, islets and rocks in the sea. It is the most indented island group in the Mediterranean. Regardless of whether you look at the Kornati Islands from the air, from the sea, or from sightseeing points on the islands, the view is equally impressive – and yet different to the eye every single time. Every vista is more than worth experiencing, and every perspective worth examining. Dry stone walls on the Kornati Islands are silent and steadfast
witnesses to hard work on modest soil on stone surrounded by crystal-clear sea. The Kornati Islands are the stone pearls of the Mediterranean.
The islands and islets of Kornati are scattered like in a play of sorts between the stone and the sea. In good weather, it is a silent play of blue and gray. When the winds start blowing, the archipelago starts speaking in the sound of waves... However, the Kornati Islands are a well-known shelter for sailors whenever the sea shows its rage and strength, too strong to even care about man as a temporary guest.
The archipelago includes eighty nine islands, islets and rocks, with the total Park surface of 216.78 square kilometers. Even such dry pieces of data can bring to awareness the amazingly indented nature of the archipelago, creating landscapes nowhere else seen. The view from above is astounding, and the same goes for sightseeing points on the islands. The sea view is no different, as you watch the archipelago while your vessel passes through the sea labyrinth below the cliffs.
There are two groups of islands in the National Park – the Kornat and the Piškera island chains, with the largest island of Kornat giving its name to the archipelago. The biggest width of the archipelago within the boundaries of the Park is 6 kilometers...
Life on the Kornati Islands has always meant struggle for survival. In that persistence for survival, man has changed the appearance of islands. Barren vegetation on rocky pastures was used to feed the sheep. However, the current barren appearance of the islands, covered only here and there by an occasional green spot of vegetation, isn’t all that old. Thousands of years of use of these areas eventually resulted in a deforested, rocky landscape of the islands.
The islands of Kornati are private property in their entirety, and ninety percent of the owners live on the nearby island of Murter. Towards the end of the 19th century, these Dalmatian farmers bought off the islands from the estate-owners, and enclosed their property by dry stone walls.
Dry stone walls are monuments to amazing human hard work, skill and patience. They frequently extend from coast to coast – built in order to prevent sheep from wandering into someone else’s property. There are approximately 260 kilometers of dry stone walls on the island of Kornat alone, and in the entire territory of the National Park, their total length is impressive 330 kilometers.

N.P. KRKA


We might call it the Magnificent Seven: Bilušića buk, Brljan, Manojlovac, Rošnjak, Miljacka slap, Roški slap and Skradinski buk. These are the tufa cascades of the Krka River – for many, the most beautiful blue line of the Dalmatian karst. Gorgeous cascades and thick, rich sound of life given by water. In many of its parts, the Krka’s flow is calm, and its cascades are announced by “silver necklaces” – increasingly thick rippling of water, the color of which turns silver, resembling countless necklaces scattered
on the river. All that silver will eventually splash over the cascades, and beauty will obtain a completely new form.
When you find yourself in the area of the Dalmatian karst, which gulps water in constant thirst due to its subterranean limestone structure, and you come across a spot where up to 500 thousand liters of water literally rumbles through in a second – it is, indeed, a sight resembling a miracle.
The Krka National Park is packed with such astounding places.
The Krka River source is located near the city of Knin, and the river passes through the Knin valley and enters into a canyon that will accompany the river along most of its course. Quite nearby, sixteen kilometers downstream from Knin, is the first place where the Krka River takes a plunge, creating the Bilušića buk cascade over 20 meters high.
Through a large portion of its course, the Krka forms lakes. Brljansko Lake (1,300 x 400 meters) ends with the cascade of Brljan. The highest waterfall on the Krka River is Manojlovac, with the total height of 59.6 meters, and with the highest individual cascade reaching over 30 meters. The water colossus of the Krka is in full force there.
A sightseeing point is there as well, from where you can see an extraordinarily steep canyon, roughly two hundred meters deep. So-called “Hollow Churches”, Šupljaje, can be seen there. That’s how the folk refers to arcs made of stone, the remains of the ancient Roman camps.
Downstream of Manojlovac, one comes across the waterfall of Rošnjak, with water flowing over just one single barrier. That is precisely what makes it unique – a single cascade among multiple cascades. One kilometer downstream – there is the cascade of Miljacka. Above the river at that point, one can see two medieval fortresses: Trošenj (also referred to as Čučevo) and Nečven. The owners of Trošenj were the family Šubić, and the owners of Nečven were the families of Nelipić and Martinušić. The Turkish forces took over these fortresses in their conquests back in 1522. From that point until 1686, the view from the fortresses belonged to the various aghas, beys, fortress commanders and qadis of the Ottoman Era.
The course of the Krka is a natural picture book with so many different pages. From the first to the last page, the Krka changes its temperament countless times: it can be calm; it can form lakes; it can be wide in the valleys, and narrow and immensely strong in the canyons.

ŠIBENIK


Sibenik is the oldest Croatian self-proclaimed town on the Adriatic, the capital and cultural, educational, administrative and economic center of Šibenik-Knin County.
It is mentioned for the first time on Christmas 1066 in the gift of Petar Krešimir IV, and is also called the Krešimirov grad. Till the epidemic of plague in the mid-17th century was the largest city on the entire eastern Adriatic coast. Šibenik was de facto the capital of
Croatia from December 1944 to May 1945. It is also significant for the founding of the Croatian Navye.
St. James cathedral in Šibenik is the most important architectural achievement of the 15th and 16th centurie in Croatia. Due to its exceptional values, in 2000. it was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List, and in 2017. the fort of St. Nicholas joined it in that list.

ZADAR


Zadar is an ancient Mediterranean port city. The old town, surrounded by walls and towers on a peninsula, with a new, urban part is connected by a bridge, a symbol of the city.
In a city with the most beautiful sunset, in a maritime archipelago facing a multitude of islands and islets, which protect the city from the strong winds, enjoy the symphony of the Sea Organ and magical urban light installation Pozdrav suncu [Greeting the Sun] near the new harbour for cruise ships.
Built on Roman urban principles, where there are several major longitudinal streets traversed by a greater number of latitudinal streets, give the city a rectangular shape. The old town is a treasure trove of archaeological treasures and monuments to the ancient, medieval and Renaissance periods. This is visible by a number of sacral and architectural monuments – the church of sv. Donat [St. Donatus] where every summer the sounds of Zadar's musical evenings echo, the Roman Forum near the main square, Kalelarga - the longest and widest street, the Cathedral of sv. Stošije [St. Anastasia], an Archaeological Museum with its exceptional treasures and many other monuments of cultural and historical heritage (town gate, Arsenal, churches, museums...). .
Zadar is a powerful cultural and economic city whose life is comfortable all year round, but shows all its splendour in the summer. Visit the traditional events or contemporary events like the full moon nights, Zadar dreams, Millennium jump, Kalelarga art... Enjoy the Mediterranean cuisine, taste the sweet Maraschino cherry liqueur, and take a swim from one of the sandy beaches in the Zadar area!

Tribunj is located in central Dalmatia and in its vicinity there are numerous localities worth visiting. Excursions to the National Parks of Kornati and Krka and to the towns of Sibenik and Zadar, which abound in the historical and cultural heritage of this region, are definitely the activities that you need to consider during your holiday period.

N.P. KORNATI

The Kornati archipelago – a labyrinth of stone, with eighty nine islands, islets and rocks in the sea. It is the most indented island group in the Mediterranean. Regardless of whether you look at the Kornati Islands from the air, from the sea, or from sightseeing points on the islands, the view is equally impressive – and yet different to the eye every single time. Every vista is more than worth experiencing, and every perspective worth examining. Dry stone walls on the Kornati Islands are silent and steadfast

witnesses to hard work on modest soil on stone surrounded by crystal-clear sea. The Kornati Islands are the stone pearls of the Mediterranean.
The islands and islets of Kornati are scattered like in a play of sorts between the stone and the sea. In good weather, it is a silent play of blue and gray. When the winds start blowing, the archipelago starts speaking in the sound of waves... However, the Kornati Islands are a well-known shelter for sailors whenever the sea shows its rage and strength, too strong to even care about man as a temporary guest.
The archipelago includes eighty nine islands, islets and rocks, with the total Park surface of 216.78 square kilometers. Even such dry pieces of data can bring to awareness the amazingly indented nature of the archipelago, creating landscapes nowhere else seen. The view from above is astounding, and the same goes for sightseeing points on the islands. The sea view is no different, as you watch the archipelago while your vessel passes through the sea labyrinth below the cliffs.
There are two groups of islands in the National Park – the Kornat and the Piškera island chains, with the largest island of Kornat giving its name to the archipelago. The biggest width of the archipelago within the boundaries of the Park is 6 kilometers...
Life on the Kornati Islands has always meant struggle for survival. In that persistence for survival, man has changed the appearance of islands. Barren vegetation on rocky pastures was used to feed the sheep. However, the current barren appearance of the islands, covered only here and there by an occasional green spot of vegetation, isn’t all that old. Thousands of years of use of these areas eventually resulted in a deforested, rocky landscape of the islands.
The islands of Kornati are private property in their entirety, and ninety percent of the owners live on the nearby island of Murter. Towards the end of the 19th century, these Dalmatian farmers bought off the islands from the estate-owners, and enclosed their property by dry stone walls.
Dry stone walls are monuments to amazing human hard work, skill and patience. They frequently extend from coast to coast – built in order to prevent sheep from wandering into someone else’s property. There are approximately 260 kilometers of dry stone walls on the island of Kornat alone, and in the entire territory of the National Park, their total length is impressive 330 kilometers.

N.P. KRKA

We might call it the Magnificent Seven: Bilušića buk, Brljan, Manojlovac, Rošnjak, Miljacka slap, Roški slap and Skradinski buk. These are the tufa cascades of the Krka River – for many, the most beautiful blue line of the Dalmatian karst. Gorgeous cascades and thick, rich sound of life given by water. In many of its parts, the Krka’s flow is calm, and its cascades are announced by “silver necklaces” – increasingly thick rippling of water, the color of which turns silver, resembling countless necklaces scattered

on the river. All that silver will eventually splash over the cascades, and beauty will obtain a completely new form.
When you find yourself in the area of the Dalmatian karst, which gulps water in constant thirst due to its subterranean limestone structure, and you come across a spot where up to 500 thousand liters of water literally rumbles through in a second – it is, indeed, a sight resembling a miracle.
The Krka National Park is packed with such astounding places.
The Krka River source is located near the city of Knin, and the river passes through the Knin valley and enters into a canyon that will accompany the river along most of its course. Quite nearby, sixteen kilometers downstream from Knin, is the first place where the Krka River takes a plunge, creating the Bilušića buk cascade over 20 meters high.
Through a large portion of its course, the Krka forms lakes. Brljansko Lake (1,300 x 400 meters) ends with the cascade of Brljan. The highest waterfall on the Krka River is Manojlovac, with the total height of 59.6 meters, and with the highest individual cascade reaching over 30 meters. The water colossus of the Krka is in full force there.
A sightseeing point is there as well, from where you can see an extraordinarily steep canyon, roughly two hundred meters deep. So-called “Hollow Churches”, Šupljaje, can be seen there. That’s how the folk refers to arcs made of stone, the remains of the ancient Roman camps.
Downstream of Manojlovac, one comes across the waterfall of Rošnjak, with water flowing over just one single barrier. That is precisely what makes it unique – a single cascade among multiple cascades. One kilometer downstream – there is the cascade of Miljacka. Above the river at that point, one can see two medieval fortresses: Trošenj (also referred to as Čučevo) and Nečven. The owners of Trošenj were the family Šubić, and the owners of Nečven were the families of Nelipić and Martinušić. The Turkish forces took over these fortresses in their conquests back in 1522. From that point until 1686, the view from the fortresses belonged to the various aghas, beys, fortress commanders and qadis of the Ottoman Era.
The course of the Krka is a natural picture book with so many different pages. From the first to the last page, the Krka changes its temperament countless times: it can be calm; it can form lakes; it can be wide in the valleys, and narrow and immensely strong in the canyons.

ŠIBENIK

Sibenik is the oldest Croatian self-proclaimed town on the Adriatic, the capital and cultural, educational, administrative and economic center of Šibenik-Knin County.
It is mentioned for the first time on Christmas 1066 in the gift of Petar Krešimir IV, and is also called the Krešimirov grad. Till the epidemic of plague in the mid-17th century was the largest city on the entire eastern Adriatic coast. Šibenik was de facto the capital of

Croatia from December 1944 to May 1945. It is also significant for the founding of the Croatian Navye.
St. James cathedral in Šibenik is the most important architectural achievement of the 15th and 16th centurie in Croatia. Due to its exceptional values, in 2000. it was included in the UNESCO World Heritage List, and in 2017. the fort of St. Nicholas joined it in that list.

ZADAR

Zadar is an ancient Mediterranean port city. The old town, surrounded by walls and towers on a peninsula, with a new, urban part is connected by a bridge, a symbol of the city.
In a city with the most beautiful sunset, in a maritime archipelago facing a multitude of islands and islets, which protect the city from the strong winds, enjoy the symphony of the Sea Organ and magical urban light installation Pozdrav suncu [Greeting the Sun] near the new harbour for cruise ships.

Built on Roman urban principles, where there are several major longitudinal streets traversed by a greater number of latitudinal streets, give the city a rectangular shape. The old town is a treasure trove of archaeological treasures and monuments to the ancient, medieval and Renaissance periods. This is visible by a number of sacral and architectural monuments – the church of sv. Donat [St. Donatus] where every summer the sounds of Zadar's musical evenings echo, the Roman Forum near the main square, Kalelarga - the longest and widest street, the Cathedral of sv. Stošije [St. Anastasia], an Archaeological Museum with its exceptional treasures and many other monuments of cultural and historical heritage (town gate, Arsenal, churches, museums...). .
Zadar is a powerful cultural and economic city whose life is comfortable all year round, but shows all its splendour in the summer. Visit the traditional events or contemporary events like the full moon nights, Zadar dreams, Millennium jump, Kalelarga art... Enjoy the Mediterranean cuisine, taste the sweet Maraschino cherry liqueur, and take a swim from one of the sandy beaches in the Zadar area!

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